OJ 704 Seg 3

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
704
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
VELCO
Body: 

If you want to have the lights, computer and other household appliances come on at the flip of a switch, you need to have reliable energy. Generating and transmitting electricity has never been synonymous with wildlife conservation, but today one Vermont power company is leading the way in integrating wildlife management into its mission of providing safe, dependable energy to its customers. The Vermont Electric Power Company, or VELCO, manages 635 miles of power line right-of-ways, which collectively cover almost 13,000 acres across Vermont. For years management objectives were simply to keep the power line corridor free of high-growing vegetation to prevent potential power outages. With minor changes to its management practices, VELCO is now playing an important role in providing habitat for a variety of wildlife species.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1922637720?starttime=1111000&end=1528
Image: 
Order: 
3

OJ 101 Seg 3

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
101
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Beaver Baffles
Body: 

When it comes to making things out of wood no animal is more persistent and more proficient than the beaver. Beaver dams provide valuable wet land habitat for several species of fish and wildlife. But these same dams can cause a lot of damage to roads and septic systems. In this segment, we look at a unique project called the "Cooperative Beaver Baffle Demonstration Project" that uses water control structures to properly manage beaver dam water levels.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1915273157?starttime=780000&end=1073
Image: 
Order: 
3

OJ 102 Seg 2

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
102
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Duck Boxes
Body: 

Over-harvesting in the 18th century combined with loss of natural habitat nearly lead to the extinction of the North American Wood Duck. But thanks to conservation efforts such as the construction and installation of wood duck boxes in wetlands this beautiful bird has had a resurgence. In this segment we tag along with District Wildlife Biologist John Mlcuch as he visits State-maintained duck boxes in Vermont and learn about the nesting habits of the North American "woodie."

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1915282551?starttime=642000&end=889
Image: 
Order: 
5

OJ 103 Seg 2

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
103
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Conservation Camp
Body: 

The Vermont Department of Fish & Wildlife's Green Mountain Conservation Camp Program gives kids a chance to get hands-on experience in conservation, outdoor skills and hunter safety. In addition to developing social interaction, group cooperation and leadership skills, the camps promote an awareness and appreciation of the natural environment. We spent a day at Camp Kehoe on Lake Bomoseen to get a first-hand look at the summer fun and the learning experience of conservation camp.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1915249666?starttime=604000&end=890
Image: 
Order: 
2

OJ 104 Seg 4

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
104
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Spiny Softshell Turtles
Body: 

Spiny Softshell Turtles are part of Vermont's natural heritage. But these shy creatures are at risk of vanishing in both Vermont and Quebec due to waterfront development of their natural habitats. There are only two know nesting sites of this turtle in Vermont. But even though the sites are posted, turtles are still killed every year by careless individuals. The Lake Champlain Basin Science Center recently rescued some baby turtles from damaged nesting areas. They were raised at both the center and the Ecomuseum and Montreal. We recently joined members of the center for the turtle's reintroduction to their original nesting sites.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1915205288?starttime=1287000&end=1592
Image: 
Order: 
5

OJ 105 Seg 2

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
105
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Stream Fish Survey
Body: 

To properly manage Vermont's streams, wildlife officials need to survey them. The information gathered from these stream surveys is used in determining minimum lengths and quantities for anglers in addition to stocking needs and assessments of the overall stream health. Detailed records are kept on each survey and compared with previous findings to help determine environmental impacts of development near the streams. We tagged along this past spring with two Vermont Wildlife Fisheries Biologists to see how a stream is surveyed.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1915237511?starttime=557000&end=857
Image: 
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2
Extra Info: 
  • Bald Hill Fish Culture Station
    60 Abbott Hill Road
    West Burke, VT 05871-9644
    Supervisor: Chris Thompson
    Fish Culturist: John Talbot
    802-467-3660
  • Bennington Fish Culture Station
    R.R. 2, Box 3859
    Bennington, VT 05201
    Supervisor: Monty Walker
    Assistant Supervisor: Vacant
    Fish Culturists: Brook Bicking,
    Todd Lincoln
    Fish Culture Worker: Thomas Dwyer
    802-447-2844
  • Ed Weed Fish Culture Station
    14 Bell Hill Road
    Grand Isle, VT 05458
    Supervisor: Dan Marchant
    Maintenance Supervisor: Mark LaBonte
    and Kevin Kelsey
    Fish Culturists: James Bellinghiri,
    Gabe Cameron,Tom Chairvolotti,Sean Hilpl,
    Priscilla Stutz-Lumbra, Gregory Owens
    802-372-3171
  • Roxbury Fish Culture Station
    3696 Roxbury Road
    Roxbury, VT 05669
    Supervisor: Ralph Barber
    Fish Culturists: Dudley Leavitt,
    Ross Wehnke
    802-485-7568
  • Salisbury Fish Culture Station
    646 Lake Dunmore Rd.
    Salisbury, VT 05759
    Supervisor: Tom Dumont
    Assistant Supervisor: George Scribner
    Fish Culturists: Michael Ellis,
    Allan Moorehouse
    802-352-4371
  • Vermont Agency of Natural Resources
  • Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department

OJ 107 Seg 2

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
107
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Natural Communities
Body: 

A natural community is an area that has experienced minimal human alteration. But when people spend time outdoors, in the woods or fields or along a stream, chances are they're passing through more than one natural community, sometimes resulting in a disturbance in the natural order. Understanding how these assemblages of plants, animals, insects, fish and reptiles co-exist can help preserve and protect the environment in which they live. We join Leif Richardson of the Vermont Non-game and Natural Heritage Program for a look at several natural communities in Niquette Bay State Park in Colchester.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1912266201?starttime=523000&end=775
Image: 
Order: 
2

OJ 109 Seg 3

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
109
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Deeryard
Body: 

A deeryard is a wintering habitat, a dense, overhead canopy of softwood trees such as hemlock, cedar, fir and spruce. In addition to providing a source of food, tree branches intercept snow before it reaches the ground and with time melts or dissipates it as water vapor, keeping the snow to a minimum. If the deeryard is on a south-facing slope, it can be a source of heat for the herd. The number of deeryards determines how many deer the landscape can support. We spent some time recently with wildlife biologist John Buck to learn more about deeryards and why they're so important to deer.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1399322111?starttime=805000&end=1076
Image: 
Order: 
5

OJ 201 Seg 2

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
201
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Lake Sturgeon
Body: 

There are seven species of sturgeon in the United States. These long, armor-plated fish are virtually unchanged since prehistoric times. Mature lake sturgeon grow to about three to five feet in length and can weigh over 100 pounds. It wasn't long ago that Lake Sturgeon were commercially fished on Lake Champlain. Today they are an endangered (threatened) species. Host Lawrence Pyne joins Chet MacKenzie of the Vermont Department of Fish & Wildlife's Lake Champlain Sturgeon Restoration Program, to find out what is being done to reestablish one of the lake's ancient creatures.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1912204584?starttime=567000&end=985
Image: 
Order: 
2
Extra Info: 
  • Chet MacKenzie
    VT Dept. of Fish & Wildlife
    317 Sanitorium Road, West Wing
    Pittsford, VT 05763

OJ 204 Seg 2

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
204
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Loon Recovery
Body: 

With the loon population of Vermont down to eight nesting pairs in 1983, the Loon Recovery Project combined the talents of the Vermont Institute of Natural Science (VINS) and the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department to study ways to increase the loon population. Outdoor Journal visits with Eric Hanson, project biologist and the kids of Vermont Audubon's "Take Part Program" as they demonstrate what they have done to increase the loon population to almost forty nesting pairs.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1912131845?starttime=687000&end=1033
Image: 
Order: 
2

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