OJ 505 Seg 1

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
505
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Bobcat Research
Body: 

Bobcats range through portions of all 48 contiguous states, yet in recent years they have become a species of concern here in Vermont.

Download the teaching materials created by Len Schmidt (and students), Community High School of Vermont, S. Burlington, VT.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1399373984?starttime=87000&end=795
Image: 
Order: 
1

OJ 606 Seg 2

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
606
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Moose Survey
Body: 

Vermont’s Moose population was virtually extirpated by the late 1800’s. By 1980 an estimated 200 moose had made their way back into the mountains of the Northeast Kingdom and the numbers have been on the rise ever since. The fact that moose can be found in every Vermont county is great news but as the population increases so does some of the negative impacts. Knowing the number of moose in the state is critical to properly manage the population. To accomplish an accurate count, the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department is going high tech using infrared technology from the sky.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1890749077?starttime=658000&end=1023
Image: 
Order: 
5

OJ 601 Seg 2

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
601
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Big Night
Body: 

On warm early spring nights amphibians across Vermont are on the move. Salamanders and frogs migrate in mass from their upland wintering habitat to wetland breeding grounds. Unfortunately in many areas these migrations take them across heavily traveled roads resulting in high mortality rates. In recent years however a dedicated group of volunteers has been keeping an eye on the spring weather. When conditions are right these salamander saviors descend on known crossing sites both to ensure a safe migration and to learn more about some of Vermont’s most delicate and rarest residents.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1890829178?starttime=705000&end=1144
Image: 
Order: 
5

OJ 602 Seg 1

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
602
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Timber Rattle Snakes
Body: 

Mention the word “rattlesnake” and the reaction you’ll get is either awe and fascination or fear and loathing. Timber rattlesnakes are listed as an endangered species in six of the 27 states that they inhabit from New Hampshire to northern Florida. Here in Vermont at the northern extent of their range a small population exists and is barely holding on after years of persecution. Today wildlife biologists, the Nature Conservancy and concerned volunteers are taking steps to ensure that timber rattlesnakes survive and thrive in Vermont.

Start Time: 
83
End Time: 
573
Image: 
Order: 
5

OJ 604 Seg 2

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
604
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Duck Banding
Body: 

The first record of banding birds in North America dates back to 1803 when John James Audubon tied silver cords to the legs of phoebes. This allowed him to identify two of the nestlings when they returned the following year. It wasn’t until 1902 when the first scientific system of banding began in North America. In the early 1900’s concerns over the declining numbers of waterfowl, passenger pigeons and over harvesting of egrets for their plumes resulted in an international agreement to manage migratory birds. Over the past century banding data has been a critical tool used to manage waterfowl. Banding birds requires capturing them and when it comes to waterfowl the most effective method is the use of rocket netting.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1890817874?starttime=611000&end=1191
Image: 
Order: 
5

OJ 605 Seg 3

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
605
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Wise on Weeds
Body: 

For centuries various plant species have been imported from other countries as ornamentals for various landscaping projects. They may look great when manicured by a landscaper but when these plants are spread into the wild they can become extremely invasive, out-competing native plants, increase erosion along stream banks, and provide less nutritious food and insufficient cover for wildlife. To help combat the spread and promote awareness of invasive plants the Nature Conservancy has developed a program to get us all “Wise on Weeds”

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1890829155?starttime=1056000&end=1534
Image: 
Order: 
5

OJ 804 Seg 3

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
804
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Conservation Leaders
Body: 

Almost half of today's students graduating with a wildlife degree have never hunted and have a minimal understanding of the impact that hunters provide to wildlife management and other conservation programs. In 2005 the Wildlife Management Institute and Max McGraw Wildlife Foundation began the Conservation Leaders for Tomorrow program as a way to introduce students to the culture and concepts of hunting. For the last two years the Conservation Leaders for Tomorrow program has held their program at Camp Kehoe on Lake Bomoseen in Castleton, Vermont.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1473762816?starttime=904000&end=1531
Image: 
Order: 
3
Extra Info: 

Web Series: Makin’ Friends With Ryan Miller

Vermont transplant and Guster frontman Ryan Miller seeks out far-fetched friends across the state! Available exclusively online.

Vermont Winners!

Check out winning Vermont entries to the 2014 PBS Kids Writers Contest!

Videos & Games for Kids

Tons of videos and games for children from PBS!

CEO Search

Vermont PBS has opened a search for a Chief Executive Officer with the title of President & CEO who will report directly to the organization's Board of Directors. Learn more...

Lifelong Learning

PBS Kids - Tons of videos and games for children from PBS!

Educator Resources - Lesson plans, online courses, and videos for teachers and parents.


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