Raptors and Other Predatory Birds

Date: 
Saturday, June 11, 2011 2:00 pm
Address: 
http://www.vtstateparks.com/htm/events.htm
City, State: 
Vergennes, Vt.
Source: 
Nature Walks (only on OJ pg)
Featured Event: 
No

Monthly Wildlife Walk Up

Date: 
Saturday, June 11, 2011 8:00 am
Address: 
http://ottercreekaudubon.org
City, State: 
Middlebury, Vt.
Source: 
Nature Walks (only on OJ pg)
Featured Event: 
No

Monthly Bird Monitoring at GMAC (Green Mountain Audubon Center

Date: 
Saturday, June 11, 2011 8:00 am
Address: 
http://www.greenmountainaudubon.org/index.php?option=com_jevents&view=cat&task=cat.listevents&Itemid=39
City, State: 
Huntington, Vt.
Source: 
Nature Walks (only on OJ pg)
Featured Event: 
No

Beginner Bird Walk For Youth

Date: 
Saturday, June 4, 2011 8:30 am
Address: 
http://www.northbranchnaturecenter.org/programs.html
City, State: 
Wells River, Vt.
Source: 
Nature Walks (only on OJ pg)
Featured Event: 
No

Youth Birding Field Trip

Date: 
Saturday, June 4, 2011 8:30 am
Address: 
http://www.nekaudubon.org/stories/storyReader$50
City, State: 
Danville, Vt.
Source: 
Nature Walks (only on OJ pg)
Featured Event: 
No

OJ 402 Seg 3

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
402
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Magog Bass
Body: 

Lake Champlain is the most popular lake in Vermont to come to for bass fishing. But for those willing to explore the Northeast Kingdom, Lake Memphremagog offers anglers an opportunity for some of the best largemouth and smallmouth fishing in the Green Mountain State. Lake Memphremagog is about 25 miles long and straddles the Vermont-Quebec border. It's full of structure, ledges and weed beds that provide a great habitat for bass. The average smallmouth you'll reel in is probably 2 to 2 3/4 pounds. But they can get up in the 4- to 5-pound range. Largemouth bass can get upwards of 7 pounds. Smallmouth BassBill Engelmann of Northeast Kingdom Guide service is convinced that many lakes in that part of Vermont hold trophy-sized small- and largemouth bass. It's all a matter of knowing your bait. Bill says, "You gotta feed them what they're biting on and the color that they want." Bass can be finicky. Sometimes you have to go through a lot of plastic and a variety of colors to hit on the right combination. But for those fisherman who know what they're looking for, the bass in Lake Memphremagog offer a chance to pull in a trophy-sized beauty that's loads of fun to catch. Host Lawrence Pyne joins Bill Engelmann of Northeast Kingdom Guide Service for a day of bass fishing on Lake Memphremagog.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1903146426?starttime=1041000&end=1551
Image: 
Order: 
3

OJ 402 Seg 2

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
402
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Five-Lined Skink
Body: 

If you've seen a five-lined skink in Vermont, consider yourself lucky. Though much more common in warmer climates, in New England, these elusive reptiles are only found in small, specialized habitats of Vermont and Connecticut. Though they come out during the daytime hours, they are one of nature's most seldom seen reptiles here in the north. The five-lined skink is a smooth shiny lizard about five to eight inches long, with rows of tiny scales around the center of their body. Their name comes from the five yellow-toned stripes running from their nose down through their tail. Another interesting marking found on juvenile skinks is their bright blue tails. And they're fast — hence the nickname "blue-tailed swift." Over time those tails turn gray and their pattern becomes less conspicuous. Being conspicuous is not in the lizard's nature. Five-Lined SkinkThey prefer steep rocky areas with patchy tree and shrub cover, rotten logs and leaf litter. They're very fast and are quick to run for cover when a predator is near. They also have an interesting defense mechanism: If caught, they can shed their tail which has the unique ability to squirm on it's own, diverting the attention of the predator and allowing the lizard to beat a hasty retreat. Vermont is the extent of the skink's northern range and so far their populations have only been recorded in the town of West Haven. Thanks to the Nature Conservancy, the land that supports Vermont's only skink population is protected from development. In this segment we head out with a Nature Conservancy volunteer to attempt to find and videotape the elusive five-lined skink in its Vermont habitat.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1903146426?starttime=662000&end=1040
Image: 
Order: 
2

OJ 402 Seg 1

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
402
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Dragon Boats
Body: 

Dragon boats are born from legend. The legend is of Chinese poet, Qu Yuan, who after being banished from his country and hearing his homeland was invaded, threw himself in a river and drowned. It is said the River Dragon shared his sorrow and flew to a quiet place with him. Over two thousand years have passed since then, but the legend of Qu Yuan lives on today with the help of Dragon Boat festivals held around the world in his honor. One of the highlights of these festivals are the Dragon Boat races. A dragon boat is a slender watercraft about 40 feet long and designed to be paddled by a team of 20 people sitting side by side. A dragon figurehead adorns the bow of the boat. Also in the bow sits a drummer, who beats an even tempo to help keep the paddlers in unison. In the stern of the boat sits a steer person, who controls the direction of the craft with a 9-foot oar, but also gives various commands to the crew. The drummer and steer person are in charge in this sport. At a festival, multiple dragon boats compete in heats to determine a winner. Fifty thousand people participate in this sport worldwide and all ages, genders and ability levels are welcome. All you need for the sport is a paddle, a lifejacket, stamina and the ability to work in a team. No special skills are required. Dragonheart Vermont The sport has also become a way for cancer survivors and those battling the disease to band together to raise public awareness. There are over 50 teams comprised of breast cancer survivors throughout the United States and Canada. Dragonheart Vermont is one such organization. Host Marianne Eaton joins the Dragonheart Vermont team as they take part in the annual Pawtucket Rhode Island Dragon Boat competition.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1903146426?starttime=80000&end=661
Image: 
Order: 
1

OJ 403 Seg 2

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
403
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Adirondack Guideboats
Body: 

When you first see an Adirondack guideboat, your eyes might trick you into thinking it's a big, wide canoe with extra-long paddles. While it is a double-ended rowing boat, the similarities end there. Adirondack guideboats were the creation of 19th-century guides in the Adirondack lake region who needed a watercraft that could hold passengers, all their camping and hunting gear, a dog and maybe the bounties of their hunting and fishing endeavors. Because the water was not always easily accessible back then, the boat had to be light enough to portage from lake to lake, meaning the guide had to be able to carry the craft on his back, sometimes for long distances. The boats had to not only be light, they had to be adaptable to changing conditions in the wild including waves, wind and rough landing areas. Standard rowboats were not suited to this travel task and the Adirondack guideboat was born, being refined over many years by the guides themselves, which produced a watercraft of remarkable stability, maneuverability and light weight. These boats became the choice of guides throughout the Adirondack lake region. By the latter part of the 19th century, when visitors from cities such as Boston and New York were drawn from the Adirondacks to the Catskills, these North Country watercraft were no longer in high demand. But thanks to its durable design, which makes it easy to row and big enough to carry lots of gear, the guideboats remained a favorite with outdoor enthusiasts, often being passed down through generations. Today, early guideboats are sought-after museum pieces and a whole new generation has discovered the advantages of these graceful craft. Steve Kaulback can be credited with assisting the return of interest in Adirondack guideboats. Coming from a fine arts background, he became interested in the aesthetics of the boat. "And then I got in one for the first time," he says, "and [I] realized that the adage 'form follows function' is just so true ... not only was it a beautiful boat, but it was one of the finest performing boats I had ever been in." His interest led him to create Adirondack Guideboat Inc. in Charlotte, Vermont. Steve not only builds both wooden and fiberglass Adirondack guideboats but also offers a kit to anyone interested in building their own cedar model. In this segment, host Marianne Eaton takes to the water in an Adirondack, and joins Steve Kaulback in the shop at Adirondack Guideboat to lend a hand in building one of these amazing, historical boats.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1903146870?starttime=928000&end=1426
Image: 
Order: 
2

OJ 403 Seg 1

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
403
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Rapid River Brookies
Body: 

The Rapid River in Western Maine is 3.2 miles long. Forming an outlet of the Rangeley chain of lakes, it begins at Lower Richardson. From Middle Dam to Lake Umbagog, it drops about 180 feet, making it one of the fastest falling rivers east of the Mississippi. It flows constantly, and with the help of the cool, oxygen-filled water released by Middle Dam, it creates the perfect habitat for trout — big trout. Three- to six-pound native brook trout can be found on the Rapid River along with landlocked salmon that were introduced in the late 19th century. It's a difficult river to get to, but for New Englanders used to pulling in ten-inch "brookies," the Rapid presents a rare opportunity to catch the trophy-sized fish of their dreams. From opening day in May until the end of the season in September, Aldro French of Rapid River Fly-Fishing guides trips on the river. The trout fishing on the Rapid is legendary and, being a guide, French is always asked the same questions: "What's the best week in May? What's the best week in June? What's the best week in July?" According to French, "It's the best week when you hit it and … you're in hog heaven when you hit it because you can catch 40 or 50 fish and half of them would be big fish." French lives and works out of his summer home, Forest Lodge, located near the Lower Dam. It's one of two sporting camps on the Rapid River and is the former home of Louise Dickinson Rich. It was there that the Maine author wrote her bestseller We Took to the Woods in 1942. In this segment, host Lawrence Pyne joins Aldro French on the Rapid River in search of trophy brook trout.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1903146870?starttime=83000&end=922
Image: 
Order: 
1

Vermont Public Television is holding free screenings in February, March and April in commemoration of Black History Month.

In connection with The Story of the Jews, WNET Education is launching an essay contest for high school aged students to examine how stories shape our identities.

Meet some extraordinary women in Vermont.

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