OJ 407 Seg 1

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
407
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Shed Hunting
Body: 

Shed hunting doesn't get the press of deer or other types of hunting. There is no official season. You don't use a gun or bow. In fact, the only equipment you use are your legs and eyes. Shed hunting refers to the finding of antlers that animals have shed. Animals such as deer and moose shed their antlers in winter so they can grow larger ones in the spring. Moose antlers can grow very fast — as much as an inch a day. When they are fully developed they can weigh as much as sixty pounds. Deer and moose will shed their antlers anytime between November and March. The best time to hunt for sheds is either in early December before there is a lot of snow buildup or in late winter early spring as the snow melts away. Steve Foster has been hunting sheds for 45 years. He says that some of the best ones have been found in November. Though he's not ready to give up on rifle hunting season yet, Steve says hunting sheds has become an obsession with him. He heads out as soon as deer season is over. "There's nothing like it. I just love doing it. I love being outside in the winter. It's a beautiful time of the year." Hunting for sheds is like looking for a needle in a haystack. It requires some of the same skills regular hunting does. You have to look for the signs, such as the rubs on the trees, tracks and beds. You have to be familiar with the type of habitat of your animal. And this is a silent prey. A shed doesn't bolt when you approach it. It will let you walk right by without moving. It requires keen eyes, woodsmanship and a passion for being outdoors. Host Lawrence Pyne joins Steve Foster on a moose shed hunt in winter.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1399351288?starttime=84000&end=829
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OJ 408 Seg 3

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
408
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Brook Trout Fishing
Body: 

The brook trout is the official cold water fish of Vermont. It is the only native trout in Vermont streams. Their body is a dark olive color and their sides are pale with small red spots surrounded by light blue halos. Their backs have wavy lines that aid in camouflaging the fish. Brookies like cold, clear water. They are one of the most cold tolerant of trout. And with Vermont's small spring-fed brooks providing thousands of miles of habitat, they are often found in densities rarely seen on larger mainstream rivers. These very waters are collectively the last stronghold of wild trout in the state. Fishing for brook trout can take you deep into the woods for a solitary nature experience. Sometimes there is a lot of hiking and exploration involved. It's not uncommon to park your car and hike a couple of miles through dense woods to find your spot. Once you find the cold, clear water that they love, the rest is up to you. Brookies can be forgiving as far as bait presentation goes. You can fish for them with a spinning reel and worms, but flies are probably the bait of choice. The brook trout's love of cold, clear water is also a good indicator of habitat conditions. Their populations are relatively stable compared to fifty years ago. However, the streams where they live are endangered by development and land use practices that threaten to degrade habitat and take away one of the Vermont angler's favorite fish. In this segment, host Lawrence Pyne joins avid fly fisherman Peter Burton for a day of fishing for brook trout in the Green Mountain National Forest.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1399359414?starttime=943000&end=1566
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OJ 408 Seg 2

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
408
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Fish and Wildlife Management for Educators
Body: 

Usually Conservation Camp at Buck Lake in Woodbury is filled with kids ages 12 to 14 getting hands-on experience in things such as fishery and wildlife management, hunter firearms safety, fishing techniques and wetland investigation. But for one week in July, it's the teachers who are at camp learning. It's a program called "Wildlife Management for Educators." For one week, teachers learn firsthand about fish and wildlife management issues, ecology, conservation and forestry. Combining classroom studies and field trips into the woods, wetlands, lakes and streams of Vermont, the aim of the program is to infuse fish and wildlife conservation messages into teachers' classroom curricula. In this segment, Outdoor Journal spends a day with a group of teachers as they venture into forests and streams to measure fish populations, examine insects, visit deer wintering yards and collect various plant and animal specimens.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1399359414?starttime=614000&end=973
Image: 
Order: 
2

OJ 408 Seg 1

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
408
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Telemark Skiing
Body: 

Telemarking is a graceful sport. It's not as rigid as regular alpine skiing; there's a freedom in Telemarking that you don't find with hard boots and stiff bindings. It's not about speed, though you can go fast if you want to. And you can do it anywhere. It doesn't require a groomed mountain or a lift — you can hike up into the backcountry, strap on your skis and go. Because Telemarking incorporates different types of turns, it allows you to tackle a variety of diverse terrain. It's easier in the bumps. It's easier in the trees to turn. And there's no right or wrong. There are a variety of techniques you can adapt to fit your style. The first thing you notice about a Telemark skier is that they appear to kneel as they ski. This is due to the fact that the heel is free and not locked into the boot, much like it is in cross-country skiing. This kneeling position gives the skier more stability and contributes to the turns. If you look at ski jumpers in the Olympics, you'll notice that they finish in the Telemark drop. That's because it's so stable. With a more flexible boot, the turn actually strengthens and there is less pressure on the knee. Also, because the shins aren't straining against a boot, there is more comfort. Telemark skis are side cut, which helps to increase their turning ability. This allows the skier to bend more, move more and participate in the run, interact more with the terrain. Telemarking becomes a personal expression of how you move. And it's addictive. Dick Hall is the founder of the North American Telemark Organization (NATO). He calls Telemark skiing "pure physical pleasure." Dick says, "I've met thousands who used to alpine, but never one who used to Telemark." In this segment, host Marianne Eaton joins Dick Hall for a Telemark lesson. Then we visit the 30th Annual NATO Telemark Festival in Mad River Glen.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1399359414?starttime=84000&end=612
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Dine & Discuss The Lesser Known Works Of Louisa May Alcott

Date: 
Wednesday, May 18, 2011 6:15 pm - 8:00 pm
Location: 
Brownell Library
Address: 
6 Lincoln Street
City, State: 
Essex Jct., Vt.
Phone: 
802-878-6955
Source: 
VPT sponsored
Description: 

The Brownell Library in Essex Jct., Vt., has received a grant to develop screenings, lectures and other activities related to the American Masters program Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind ‘Little Women.’

Dine & Discuss @ Brownell Library in Essex Junction on Wednesday, May 18, 2011, 6:15-8 p.m., features The Lesser Known Works of Louisa May Alcott:  Naughty and Naughtier.  Mary Lou Kete, Associate Professor of English and Women’s Studies at the University of Vermont, animates the discussion of Transcendental Wild Oats (1873), Alcott’s satire of life in a utopian community based on her childhood experience, and “Behind a Mask: or, a Woman’s Story,” (1866), a so-called “blood and thunder” tale, published under her pseudonym A.M. Barnard.  Copies are available at the library or on-line:  Participants are asked to bring a pot-luck dish inspired by the texts.  Space is limited; RSVP 802-878-6955. 

All programs are free and open to the public. For more information about this and other events, contact the Brownell Library via email, phone (802) 878-6955 or visit the library's website.

Louisa May Alcott:  The Woman Behind 'Little Women,' a documentary film co-produced by Nancy Porter Productions, Inc. and Thirteen/WNET New York’s American Masters, and a biography of the same name written by Harriet Reisen.  Louisa May Alcott programs in libraries are sponsored by the American Library Association Public Programs Office with the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities. 

Vermont Public Television and Vermont Humanities Council are in concert with Brownell Library.  Brownell Library is also grateful for the support of Friends of Brownell Library and The Brownell Library Foundation. 

Featured Event: 
Yes

VTW - Governor Shumlin Press Conference

Series: 
Vermont This Week
Episode #: 
2930
Zone: 
Open Area
Header: 
Governor Shumlin Press Conference 4/29/2011
Body: 

Order: 
1

Screening of "Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind Little Women"

Date: 
Wednesday, May 25, 2011 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Location: 
Brownell Library
Address: 
6 Lincoln Street
City, State: 
Essex Jct, Vt.
Phone: 
802-878-6955
Source: 
VPT sponsored
Description: 

The Brownell Library in Essex Jct., Vt., has received a grant to develop screenings, lectures and other activities related to the American Masters program "Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind ‘Little Women.’" 

On Wednesday, May 25, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Brownell Library features Louisa May Alcott: The Woman Behind Little Women, the documentary film co-produced by Nancy Porter Productions, Inc. and Thirteen/WNET New York’s American Masters, followed by a discussion led by Mary Lou Kete, Associate Professor of English and Women’s Studies at the University of Vermont.

All programs are free and open to the public. For more information about this and other events, contact the Brownell Library via email, phone 802-878-6955 or visit the library's website.

Louisa May Alcott:  The Woman Behind Little Women, a documentary film co-produced by Nancy Porter Productions, Inc. and Thirteen/WNET New York’s American Masters, and a biography of the same name written by Harriet Reisen.  Louisa May Alcott programs in libraries are sponsored by the American Library Association Public Programs Office with the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities. 

Vermont Public Television and Vermont Humanities Council are in concert with Brownell Library.  Brownell Library is also grateful for the support of Friends of Brownell Library and The Brownell Library Foundation. 

Featured Event: 
Yes

OJ 501 Seg 2

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
501
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Sailing
Body: 

Lake Champlain, stretching 121 miles in length, is the sixth largest lake in the U.S. The rugged shoreline, rocky outcroppings and ever changing winds challenge sailors of all abilities. One of the oldest sailing clubs in the country, Lake Champlain Yacht Club in Shelburne, Vermont, has offered sailing instruction and hosted weekly races on Lake Champlain for 118 years. Join host Marianne Eaton as she "gets her sea legs" and experiences why sailing has captivated people for centuries.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1899837720?starttime=980000&end=1524
Image: 
Order: 
2

OJ 501 Seg 1

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
501
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Bow Fishing
Body: 

From trolling for trout and salmon to jigging for pan fish, Lake Champlain has something to offer to just about any angler. However, one of the big lake's most unique fishing opportunities is experienced by few fishermen — bow fishing for carp, bowfin and long nose gar. These prehistoric fish are seldom caught by anglers, but may be taken year round with a bow and arrow. On calm sunny days, they can be found swimming in shallow shore waters where they provide bow fishermen with exciting and sometimes non-stop action. It's part fishing, part hunting and a great way for bow hunters to keep their shooting skills sharp during the long off-season. Host Lawrence Pyne joins longtime bow fishermen Steve and Mike Beyor on the shallow waters of Missisquoi Bay for an exciting day of bow fishing..

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1899837720?starttime=75000&end=976
Image: 
Order: 
1
Extra Info: 
  • Captain Gil Gagner
  • Martin's General Store
  • Highgate Springs, VT
  • 868-4459

OJ 502 Seg 3

Series: 
Outdoor Journal
Episode #: 
502
Zone: 
Segments
Header: 
Geocaching
Body: 

In today's world of high technology, we don't often dream up images of perilous treasure hunts leading to buried riches. But in fact, it is the availability of computer technology that has led to a new breed of treasure seekers, geocachers. With only a personal computer, anyone can retrieve clues and the global positioning coordinates to millions of "treasure" sites all over the world. Curious? Join us as we set off on this adventure of geocaching and discover its real value is not just the treasure hidden at the end of the trail.

Cove Link (DEPRECATED): 
http://video.vpt.org/video/1899828047?starttime=1031000&end=1565
Image: 
Order: 
3

Web Series: Makin’ Friends With Ryan Miller

Vermont transplant and Guster frontman Ryan Miller seeks out far-fetched friends across the state! Available exclusively online.

Vermont Winners!

Check out winning Vermont entries to the 2014 PBS Kids Writers Contest!

Videos & Games for Kids

Tons of videos and games for children from PBS!

Lifelong Learning

PBS Kids - Tons of videos and games for children from PBS!

Educator Resources - Lesson plans, online courses, and videos for teachers and parents.


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