African Americans: Many Rivers To Cross

Making A Way Out of No Way (1897-1940)

Episode Guide »
Something from Nothing portrays the Jim Crow era, when African Americans struggled to build their own worlds within the harsh, narrow confines of segregation. At the turn of the 20th century, a steady stream of African Americans left the South, fleeing the threat of racial violence, and searching for better opportunities in the North and the West. Leaders like Ida B. Wells, W.E.B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington and Marcus Garvey organized, offering vastly different strategies to further black empowerment and equality. Yet successful black institutions and individuals were always at risk. At the same time, the ascendance of black arts and culture showed that a community with a strong identity and sense of pride was taking hold in spite of Jim Crow. "The Harlem Renaissance" would not only redefine how America saw African Americans, but how African Americans saw themselves.

More Episodes



Comments

Share your thoughts, questions, and comments on "African Americans: Many Rivers To Cross" here.
 

Vermont Public Television is holding free screenings in February, March and April in commemoration of Black History Month.

In connection with The Story of the Jews, WNET Education is launching an essay contest for high school aged students to examine how stories shape our identities.

Meet some extraordinary women in Vermont.

A new PBS site for America's booming 50+ population as they plan for a new life stage.

Lifelong Learning


PBS Kids
Tons of videos and games for children from PBS!

Educator Resources
Lesson plans, online courses, and videos for teachers and parents


VPT Weekly

Our weekly email newsletter highlighting upcoming shows and important station news.
Sign Up Today

Vermont Public Television

204 Ethan Allen Avenue
Colchester, VT 05446
(802) 655-4800
© 2014 Vermont Public Television
All Rights Reserved

Facebook Twitter YouTube LinkedIn Pinterest